One at a Time

I’ve been trying to come up with a way to share all the great ideas I discovered and people I met while I was in Texas. And there’s only one way to do it…one at a time.

So let’s start at the beginning.

Last week I traveled to Houston, Texas for the Galloway Program Directors’ annual meeting. 60+ directors made the trip for an opportunity to meet each other, exchange ideas, and of course, meet up with Jeff Galloway and Chris Twiggs. The Woodlands Galloway group hosted this year’s meeting, and did a fantastic job. The area was great, with restaurants within walking distance of our hotel, and plenty of places to run. On Saturday, we ran right past the bike transition area for IRONMAN Texas! I could go on and on.

We had a variety of speakers on Saturday during our meeting, and I’d like to take a little time each day to highlight some of my favorites.

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I met Andy Voggenthaler on Saturday, and was immediately inspired by his presentation. An athlete himself, Andy founded Race Guards as a way to give back to the running/ cycling/ triathlete community.

From their website:

“Race Guards was established in March 2012 in San Diego, California to provide in-race first aid for athletic events throughout the country with a focus on running and cycling races, triathlons and endurance events. Race Guards is comprised of volunteers trained in CPR, AED and First Aid who are committed to assisting race participants with any medical or physical support need in a race. Race Guards work in concert with the medical director and medical support team at the events to provide medical support from start to finish.”

Here’s how it works: Once you’ve completed the safety training, you volunteer to provide support at events. You wear their jersey and carry a first aid kit. You offer motivation and basic first aid if necessary. Although some Race Guards are EMTs and medical professionals, you don’t have to be. You just have to have a heart for people and a willingness to give back to your running/ cycling community.

The goal of Race Guards is to provide this service to Race Directors free-of-charge. The funds required to run the company come from sponsors, not from buying this service. Race Guards are all volunteers! How can you argue with that?

Race Guards started in California, but they want to build teams local to races across the country. As more people volunteer in different cities and states, Race Guards can cover more races in your community.

You can find out more information about Race Guards and Volunteer for the team on their website! And don’t forget to like their Facebook Page and follow them on Twitter.

Attention Ohioans: I volunteered this week to be a Race Guard. I would love to build a team in our community to cover races like the Capital City Half Marathon, the Flying Pig Marathon, the Cleveland Marathon, the Columbus Marathon, and more! Would you consider volunteering your time to help someone else?

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Too much to do…too little time

Here’s the thing…I’m busy.
I’m a single, full-time mom.
I homeschool a kindergartener.
I run, bike, and workout most days…sometimes all three.
I manage a training group in Columbus, Ohio.
I have 3, yes 3, blogs. Lucky for you, you’ll only have to read this one as the other two are currently hibernating.
I have brand ambassador responsibilities.
I knit (and keep my fingers crossed that I get paid).

I have no life.

I wish I could read more and knit for myself or my kids.
I want to hang out with adults more. If you’ve ever tried to have a conversation with a 4 and 6-year-old, this should be self-explanatory.
And I have a ton of things to say.

I’m struggling to get all that finished, and still have time and energy to write exciting moderately entertaining legible posts. Maybe if the day had a few more hours in it. I certainly could sleep less, but you don’t want to see me on less than 6 hours of sleep.

Yesterday, my son suggested I build a time machine. That way I could go back and do all the things I want to do that I don’t have time to do. That sounds great! If you have ideas on how to start that project, please send them my way.

DMC-12I don’t think a Delorian is going to work.

I have to set a new guideline going forward so I’m not stressed about blogging. This is supposed to be fun and cathartic, right?

No posting on the weekend. Unless something miraculous happens, you won’t hear from me on Saturday or Sunday. Those days are about my family, and although I love all of you, I need that time to myself.

You can count on my posts Monday through Friday, and that’s plenty of time to know more than anyone should care to know about my life. I’ll try to use Monday’s to recap the weekend’s excitement, provided there was something to write about.

This past weekend? Nothing. And it was glorious.

I’m prepping for a big week though. Traveling to Houston this week to meet up with the big man, Jeff Galloway himself. And I have a little fun planned while I’m there. Needless to say, I hope to come back from that trip refreshed, in more ways than one.

God knows I need it.

What are you doing this week? Any big plans?

Tomorrow’s news: A Turkish What-Up?

There are no hills in Ohio!

That’s right. I said it. No hills. Not in the Columbus area anyway.

Yeah. Yeah. There “hills” at the Cliffs of Insanity (Highbanks Metro Park). You can find one or two at Sharon Woods or the Trails of Terror (Alum Creek Phase 2 MTB trail).

If you’ve never travelled outside of Columbus, OH, you might actually think those are hills. Mountains even.

You’d be wrong.

If you drive to Hocking Hills, Mohican, or Great Seal you can find some sizable hills. My Ragnar team found some beauties, most of which were grossly mislabeled, between Chattanooga and Nashville, TN.

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Here’s the thing…I like running hills. Yup. I’m certifiable. I’d rather run up a hill than a flat surface any day.
It’s no surprise I’m not a sprinter. One look at me would tell you that. But one thing I have is leg power. And I can bust up a hill!

Hill repeats are speed work in disguise. They make you faster. And stronger. When the road is flat, it will be easier because you trained on hills. And when it’s hilly…you’re prepared. So I set some incline intervals, and ran. I’m going to have to tweak the plan to make it harder over time, but you can get a great hill workout on the treadmill!

Why do I need hill training anyway? I have two half marathons planned in April: one in Xenia, OH and the other in Washington DC…neither of which necessitate the kind of hill training I’m proposing. I do, however, have a few friends running the Flying Pig Marathon this year, and from what I hear and know about Cincinnati, they’ll need the hill practice. I’m willing to come along for the ride.

Tomorrow’s news: January by the Numbers